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  • 24. To Prepare a Sample of Soap
    Leaving Cert Chemistry - By kind permission of Folens
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  • Food
    A breakdown of protein, carbohydrates, lipids, minerals, vitamins and water and why the human body needs these biomolecules, deficiency diseases and useful facts that get asked in the exam.
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  • The Cell
    A breakdown of the parts of the plant and animal cells, their functions and diagrams.
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  • 5 Pillars Made Plain
    What are the 5 Pillars of Islam? 1. Shahada (the testimony of faith) 2. Salat (prayer) 3. Zakat (alms giving) 4. Sawm (fasting) 5. Hajj (pilgrimage) Whether ...
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  • Cell Respiration and Metabolic Rate
    Notes on Cell Respiration and Metabloic rate from the Scottish Schools Education Research Centre
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  • Solar System 101 | National Geographic
    How many planets are in the solar system? How did it form in the Milky Way galaxy? Learn facts about the solar system’s genesis, plus its planets, moons, and asteroids. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe #NationalGeographic #SolarSystem #Educational About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta Read more in "The solar system, explained" https://on.natgeo.com/2U3E2Be Solar System 101 | National Geographic https://youtu.be/libKVRa01L8 National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo
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  • Why Do We Have Different Seasons? | California Academy of Sciences
    Did you know that the Sun’s light shines differently on Earth at different times of the year? In this visualization watch as the Earth orbits the Sun, rotating, like a slightly tilted, spinning top. This rotation changes the angle at which sunlight hits the surface of our planet, creating the different seasons we experience here on Earth. Can you see how sunlight at different times of the year changes the productivity of life on land and in our oceans? Data Sources: Phytoplankton Bloom Imagery: NASA Modis, Land Productivity Data: NASA Modis Land Science Team, NASA Earth Observatory Team, Imagery: Reto Stockli. Ocean Productivity Data: Michael Behrenfeld, Professor Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Oregon State University, www.science.oregonstate.edu/oceanproductivity. Earth Imagery: NASA Visible Earth. Video Credit: California Academy of Sciences Visualization Studio For classroom activities, visit www.calacademy.org/educators/habitat-earth-in-the-classroom - - - The California Academy of Sciences is the only place in the world with an aquarium, planetarium, natural history museum, and four-story rainforest all under one roof. Visit us online to learn more and to get tickets: http://www.calacademy.org. Connect with us! • Like us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/CASonFB • Follow us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/CASonTwitter • Add us on Google+: http://bit.ly/CASonGoogle
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  • Moon Phases: Crash Course Astronomy #4
    In this episode of Crash Course Astronomy, Phil takes you through the cause and name of the Moon's phases. -- Why the Moon Has Phases 0:36.1 Spheres in Orbit 1:05.4 Name of the Moon Phases 2:25.5 How We See It 7:48.2 -- PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Follow Phil on Twitter: https://twitter.com/badastronomer Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Patreon at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse -- PHOTOS http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moon#mediaviewer/File:FullMoon2010.jpg https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/multimedia/display.cfm?IM_ID=1879 http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a000000/a004200/a004236/frames/730x730_1x1_30p/moon.0505.jpg http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a000000/a004200/a004236/frames/730x730_1x1_30p/moon.0553.jpg http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a000000/a004200/a004236/frames/730x730_1x1_30p/moon.0634.jpg http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a000000/a004200/a004236/frames/730x730_1x1_30p/moon.0706.jpg http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a000000/a004200/a004236/frames/730x730_1x1_30p/moon.0809.jpg http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a000000/a004200/a004236/frames/730x730_1x1_30p/moon.0905.jpg http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a000000/a004200/a004236/frames/730x730_1x1_30p/moon.1011.jpg http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a000000/a004200/a004236/frames/730x730_1x1_30p/moon.1145.jpg http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moon#mediaviewer/File:NASA-Apollo8-Dec24-Earthrise.jpg http://global.jaxa.jp/press/2008/04/img/20080411_kaguya_01l.jpg http://global.jaxa.jp/press/2008/04/20080411_kaguya_e.html http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Operations/First_view_of_Earth_as_Rosetta_approaches_home http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sachin_Nigam_-_starry_moon_%28by-sa%29.jpg https://www.flickr.com/photos/badastronomy/14397419837/
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  • Probability: Lesson 1- Basics of Set Theory
    added by aanoshah Sets
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    Basics of Set Theory for Probability
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  • A guide to writing the Economics Research Project
    A guide to writing the research project for Leaving Cert Economics, written by an Economics teacher
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  • How to Solve Inequalities (NancyPi)
    MIT grad explains solving inequalities. This video focuses on solving linear inequalities. It shows when to switch the sign of the inequality, if you divide or multiply by a negative number, and is an introduction to how to solve inequalities in algebra. To skip ahead: 1) For a basic example of SOLVING AN INEQUALITY, skip to time 00:34. 2) For when you have to FLIP THE INEQUALITY SIGN when DIVIDING BY A NEGATIVE number, skip to 1:26. 3) For when you need to reverse the inequality symbol because you're MULTIPLYING BY A NEGATIVE number, skip to 2:42. The problems here are multi-step inequalities, or two-step inequalities. Nancy formerly of MathBFF explains the steps. Follow Nancy on Instagram: https://instagram.com/nancypi Twitter: https://twitter.com/nancypi Algebraic equations and inequalities: what is inequality math? What does inequality mean? An inequality is a number sentence that uses an inequality symbol instead of an equality symbol (=), which means it has a greater than sign, less than sign, greater than or equal to sign, or less than or equal to sign, instead of the normal equal sign in an equation. One linear inequality definition is: an inequality that involves a linear algebraic expression and inequality signs. How to find the solution of an inequality algebra problem: 1) A simple, BASIC LINEAR INEQUALITY example you might see on a solving inequalities worksheet or problem set is the expression 2x + 3 [less than or equal to] 11. You can solve for x just like you would for an equality, or normal equation, by trying to get x alone. This is an example of two-step inequalities, or multi-step inequalities. The first step is to subtract the constant 3 from both sides, in order to move it to the right hand side, so that you have 2x [less than or equal to] 8. The second step is to get x alone on the left side by dividing both sides by 2 so that your answer for the inequality is x [less than or equal to] 4. In this case, solving the inequality used the exact same steps you would use to solve an "equal sign" equation. Sometimes the steps are different from solving normal math equations. Solving for x is the same as solving a linear equality (-2x + 3 = 11) except that if you ever have to divide by a negative number or multiply by a negative number while solving for x, you must flip the sign, or switch the direction of your inequality symbol less than becomes greater than, for example). Here are the two cases of inequality problems WHEN YOU NEED TO REVERSE THE SIGN of the inequality because you're multiplying or dividing both sides of the inequality by a negative number: 2) DIVIDING EXAMPLE: For an inequality like -2x + 3 [less than or equal to] 11, after moving the constant 3 to the right side, you will need to divide both sides by negative 2 in order to get x alone on the left side for the solution. WHEN YOU DIVIDE BY A NEGATIVE NUMBER, you need to reverse the direction of the inequality symbol in your expression. In this example, after you divide out -2, you get x [greater than or equal to] -4 (instead of x less than or equal to -4) for the final solution. This example was also a two-step inequality problem. 3) MULTIPLYING EXAMPLE: For examples like (-1/2)x + 4 [greater than] 7, when you've moved the constant to the right side and have the inequality (-1/2)x [greater than] 3, the fastest way to get x alone is to clear the fraction by multiplying both sides by -2. This will cancel the 2 in the denominator and remove the negative sign in front of x on the left side. But WHEN YOU MULTIPLY BY A NEGATIVE, you have to flip the direction of the inequality symbol so that your answer is x [less than] -6 instead of x [greater than] -6. This problem was also a multi-step inequality. Note on inequality rules: you don't have to switch the symbol if you're adding a negative number or subtracting a negative number: switching the inequality sign is only for when you're multiplying or dividing by a negative number. For quadratic inequalities examples, compound inequalities, inequality math, inequality algebra, inequality equations, inequality symbols, inequality notation, and more algebra solver, equation solver, and inequality calculator practice problems that come up on worksheets, as well as more algebra, algebra 2, and college algebra mathematics videos, check out: http://nancypi.com
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  • An tEarrach Thiar le Máirtín Ó Direáin | Dánta | TG4 Foghlaim
    An Dán Cáiliúil "An tEarrach Thiar" le Máirtín Ó Direáin Tuilleadh ar fáil ag http://www.tg4.ie/ga/foghlaim/ Is acmhainn nua oideachais chlosamhairc é TG4 Foghlaim atá curtha in oiriúint do riachtanais dhaltaí iarbhunscoile agus iad ag ullmhú do Bhéaltriail Ghaeilge na hArdteistiméireachta, ach is féidir le foghlaimeoirí ag leibhéal ar bith an t-ábhar a úsáid lena gcuid scileanna teanga a fhorbairt.
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  • Othello: Study Guide | SparkNotes
    From a general summary to chapter summaries to explanations of famous quotes, the SparkNotes Othello Study Guide has everything you need to ace quizzes, tests, and essays.
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  • Evidence of a soil creep
    • Soil sometimes accumulates in a series of small ridges called terracettes. • Soil piles up behind walls, causing them to bulge and break. • Tree trunks and fences bend in the direction of soil creep. • Poles may lean in the direction of soil creep.
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  • Brooklyn Study Guide | Literature Guide | LitCharts
    The best study guide to Brooklyn on the planet, from the creators of SparkNotes. Get the summaries, analysis, and quotes you need.
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  • Brooklyn Summary | GradeSaver
    Brooklyn study guide contains a biography of Colm Toibin, literature essays, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis.
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  • Philadelphia, Here I Come! Study Guide | Literature Guide | LitCharts
    The best study guide to Philadelphia, Here I Come! on the planet, from the creators of SparkNotes. Get the summaries, analysis, and quotes you need.
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