Want to see ALL questions on this topic?

Upgrade to PLUS+ for €35 to see all past questions

You need to have an account to continue

You need to have an account to continue

A Roman City - Pompeii Resources Suggest a Resource Suggest a Resource

All
Videos
Websites
Notes
3 Resources
  • Pompeii: The Last Day (BBC)
    On 24 August AD79, the sleeping giant Mount Vesuvius erupted with horrifying force, destroying the prosperous Roman cities Pompeii and Herculeneum. Their inhabitants were subjected to 24 hours of untold horror. Four million tonnes of pumice, rock and ash rained on the towns, suffocating the life out of the cities, and burying alove those who had been unable to flee. Pompeii - The Last Day recreates that momentous day, and shows first hand the horror of Pompeii's last hours. Factual characters based on historical and forensic evidence unearthed in Pompeii and Herculaneum, as well as extracts from Gauis Plinius Monor's account of the disaster, help bring to life one of the most notorious disasters in history. Using stunning visual effects, the film recreates each stage of the 24 hour eruption and explores the devastating impact on the main characters; Julius Polybius, wealthy baker and aspiring politician; Stephanus, a cloth worker and social climber and his wife Fortunata Celadus the celebrity gladiator; Pliny the elder, in charge of the rescue mission; and, finally, Pliny the younger, who documents the horrors of the tragedy.
    read more
  • Pompeii: Rebirth of a City
    Archaeology, as we understand it, didn't exist in 1758 when Johann Joachim Winckelmann made his way from the royal library in Dresden, Germany, to visit another private collection. He wanted to see the King of Naples's museum of statues, salvaged from crude digs at the cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum, 1700 years after their destruction in the eruption of Vesuvius in AD79. The king's guards refused him entry. But Winckelmann persevered, sneaking into the museum and the excavation sites, until he published an illicit catalogue of the finds that took the civilized world by storm, sparking a new interest in, and understanding of, the classical world. At last Winckelmann's life's work was recognized, but he had to fight to the end of his life for the ideal of scientifically accurate and responsible archaeology. In the 21st century, Andrew Wallace Hadrill directs excavations at the two lost cities. He is no stranger to controversy, such as: how to save the greatest unexplored library of the ancient world, at the Villa dei Papiri, threatened by flooding and the ever-present risk of a further eruption. This film tours the lost cities (including Pompeii's famous "red-light" district) with Andrew Wallace Hadrill, recounts the drama of Winckelmann's discoveries, and tells the story of the disaster itself, as witnessed by the unique human remains that give an almost minute-by-minute account of the day of destruction.
    read more
  • Pompeii: The Last Day (BBC)
    On 24 August AD79, the sleeping giant Mount Vesuvius erupted with horrifying force, destroying the prosperous Roman cities Pompeii and Herculeneum. Their inhabitants were subjected to 24 hours of untold horror. Four million tonnes of pumice, rock and ash rained on the towns, suffocating the life out of the cities, and burying alove those who had been unable to flee. Pompeii - The Last Day recreates that momentous day, and shows first hand the horror of Pompeii's last hours. Factual characters based on historical and forensic evidence unearthed in Pompeii and Herculaneum, as well as extracts from Gauis Plinius Monor's account of the disaster, help bring to life one of the most notorious disasters in history. Using stunning visual effects, the film recreates each stage of the 24 hour eruption and explores the devastating impact on the main characters; Julius Polybius, wealthy baker and aspiring politician; Stephanus, a cloth worker and social climber and his wife Fortunata Celadus the celebrity gladiator; Pliny the elder, in charge of the rescue mission; and, finally, Pliny the younger, who documents the horrors of the tragedy. The highest ever rated history documentary on the BBC at the time of its release in 2003, it was reportedly watched by more than 10 million people. I was kindly asked to promote an e-book, so here it is: E-book Rome in a weekend: Helping you plan your weekend in Rome http://www.romesightseeing.net/e-book-rome-in-a-weekend/
    read more