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IRL. Christianity in Ireland Videos & Notes Suggest Videos or Notes

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6 Videos & Notes
  • Early Christian Ireland - HPD 20 Episode 7
    Brother Desmond introduces us to his Monastery in 5th Century Ireland. He loves being a monk although seems to have some bullying issues with brother Declan. www.irishheritage.ie
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  • Bronze Age Ireland - HPD 20 Episode 4
    Our HPD-20 series continues with Bronze Age Ireland. The Romans didn't like the naked Celtic warriors! www.irishheritage.ie HPD-20 Playlist - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLa-wge_cvJI0yJNh6hyKVmXM-iyuk7r4V
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  • Secrets of The Stones - Deciphering the High Cross
    An extract from RTE's 'Secrets of The Stones' documentary featuring Prof Dáibhi Ó Cróinín & Dr Thierry Daubos as they use laser technology to uncover the secrets of the High Cross of Clonmacnoise. Reproduced with the kind permission of RTE. Also massive thanks to Dr Heather King & Dr Peter Harbinson for their permission to show the video
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  • Skellig Michael
    The Skellig Rocks, Skellig Michael (Irish: Sceilig Mhichíl), also known as Great Skellig (Irish: Sceilig Mhór), and Little Skellig, are towering sea crags rising from the Atlantic Ocean, 11.6 km west of the Iveragh Peninsula in County Kerry, Ireland. Located at the western edge of the European landmass, Skellig Michael was the chosen destination for a small group of ascetic monks who, in their pursuit of greater union with God, withdrew from civilization to this remote and inaccessible place. Some time between the 6th and 8th century, a monastery was founded on this precipitous rock giving rise to one of the most dramatic examples of the extremes of Christian monasticism. The monastery's exact date of foundation is not known. Skellig Michael was uninhabited prior to the foundation of its monastery. The well-preserved monastic remains have retained a strong spiritual after-life which appeals strongly to the human psyche. Visitors cannot but be awestruck by the physical achievements of these early monks which, when combined with the sense of solitude, ocean and bird sounds evokes a quiet sense of magic. This is beautifully expressed by George Bernard Shaw who, following a visit in 1910, described this 'incredible, impossible, mad place' as 'part of our dream world'. Live Without Limits Subscribe to our YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/chan... Website: http://hybridtrainingsystem... Contact Us: http://hybridtrainingsystem... Like Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Hy... Follow Us on Instagram: http://instagram.com/hybrid... Follow Us on Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/Hy...
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  • Early Christian Ireland
    A PowerPoint on Early Christian Ireland
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