Want to see ALL questions on this topic?

Upgrade to PLUS+ for €35 to see all past questions

You need to have an account to continue

You need to have an account to continue

Daonra & Imirce Videos & Notes Suggest Videos or Notes

All
Videos
Websites
Notes
8 Videos & Notes
  • Population in Ireland - Changes over Time
    This is a Stats Visual Archive of Population Pyramid & Demographic Indicators in Ireland from 1950 to 2100. Demographic indicators : total population, population growth rate, total fertility rate, potential support ratio, natural increase rate. source : UN World Population Prospects 2019 video : stats visual archives ******************* Thank you for your support. We've been published over 100 videos for educational use. If you are interested into our works, please subscribe this channel and hit the like button. ******************* - twitter : http://twitter.com/StatsArchives - subscribe URL : http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoi6egDiEKh2Rhb7AtMBU4Q?sub_confirmation=1 [TREND] (Technical Terms & Definitions Below) In the 18th and early 19th centuries, Ireland experienced a major population boom as a result of the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions. In the 50-year period 1790-1840, the population of the island doubled from 4 million to 8 million. At its peak, Ireland's population density was similar to that of England and continental Europe. This changed dramatically with the Great Famine of the mid-19th century, which led to mass starvation and consequent mass emigration. The population continued a slow decline well into the 20th century, with the Republic recording a low of 2.8 million in the 1961 census. During the 1960s, the population started to grow once more, although slowly as emigration was still common. In the 1990s the country entered a period of rapid economic growth as a result of the Celtic Tiger Irish economic boom. The Republic started to receive Immigration from that had never previously happened. With the 2008 onset of the Irish economic and banking crisis, the state's economy suffered, and the Republic of Ireland has once again been experiencing net emigration of its citizens, but immigration remains high. In November 2013, Eurostat reported that the republic had the largest net emigration rate of any member state, at 7.6 emigrants per 1,000 population. The Republic has also been experiencing a baby boom, with increasing birth rates and overall fertility rates. Despite this, the total fertility rate is still below replacement depending on when the measurement is taken. The Irish fertility rate is still the highest of any European country. This increase is significantly fuelled by non-Irish immigration – in 2009, a quarter of all children born in the Republic were born to mothers who had immigrated from other countries. The population of Ireland stood at 4,588,252 in 2011, an increase of 8.2% since 2006. As of 2011, Ireland had the highest birth rate in the European Union (16 births per 1,000 of population). In 2014, 36.3% of births were to unmarried women. Annual population growth rates exceeded 2% during the 2002–2006 intercensal period, which was attributed to high rates of natural increase and immigration. This rate declined somewhat during the subsequent 2006–2011 intercensal period, with an average annual percentage change of 1.6%. The total fertility rate (TFR) in 2017 was estimated at 1.80 children born per woman, below the replacement rate of 2.1, it remains considerably below the high of 4.2 children born per woman in 1850. In 2018 the median age of the Irish population was 37.1 years. [TECHNICAL TERMS & DEFINITIONS] *AGE STRUCTURE (POPULATION PYRAMID) The composition of a population as determined by the number or proportion of males and females in each age category. The age-sex structure of a population is the cumulative result of past trends in fertility, mortality, and migration. **POPULATION GROWTH RATE The number of people added to (or subtracted from) a population in a year due to natural increase and net migration expressed as a percentage of the population at the beginning of the time period. ***TOTAL FERTILITY RATE (TFR) The average number of children that would be born alive to a woman (or group of women) during her lifetime if she were to pass through her childbearing years conforming to the age-specific fertility rates of a given year. ****POTENTIAL SUPPORT RATIO A number of people age 15–64 per one older person aged 65 or older. This ratio describes the burden placed on the working population (unemployment and children are not considered in this measure) by the non-working elderly population. *****RATE OF NATURAL INCREASE (RNI) The rate of natural increase refers to the difference between the number of live births and the number of deaths occurring in a year, divided by the mid-year population of that year, multiplied by a factor (usually 1,000). It is equal to the difference between the crude birth rate and the crude death rate. This measure of the population change excludes the effects of migration. #demographics #Ireland #statistics #population #Dublin
    read more
  • World Population Day Interesting Facts on Population
    In this video we will share history of World Population day, some stats on World Population and key facts on World Population World Population Day is an annual event, observed on July 11 every year, which seeks to raise awareness of global population issues. The event was established by the Governing Council of the United Nations Development Programme in 1989. Inspired by the public interest in Five Billion Day on July 11, 1987, the approximate date on which the world's population reached five billion people. This day was suggested by Dr. K. C. Zachariah He worked as Sr Demographer at World Bank. Suggested when world population reached Five Billion. World Population Day aims to increase people's awareness on various population issues such as : importance of family planning, gender equality, poverty, maternal health, human rights. Theme for 2020? This year the UNFPA's goal on World Population Day 2020 is to raise awareness of women's and girls' needs for sexual and reproductive health and vulnerabilities during the pandemic World Population Day Themes from past years? 2019 - Attention towards maternal health. 2018 - Family Planning as a human right 2017 - Family Planning: Empowering People, Developing Nations 2016 - Investing in teenage girls 2015 - Vulnerable populations in emergencies 2014 - Investing in Young People 2013 - Focus is on Adolescent Pregnancy 2012 - Universal Access to Reproductive Health Services 2011 - 7 Billion Actions 2010 - Be Counted: Say What You Need 2009 - Fight Poverty: Educate Girls 2008 - Plan Your Family, Plan Your Future 2007 - Men at Work 2006 - Being Young is Tough 2005 - Equality Empowers 2004 - ICPD at 10 2003 - 1,000,000,000 adolescents World Population stats? 2 Billion – 1930 4 Billion – 1974 5 Billion – 1987 6 Billion – 1999 7 Billion – 2011 7.8 Billion – 2020 World’s population is growing by 1.10 percent per year, or about an additional 83 million people annually. By 2024, India will overtake China China currently has 1.4 billion inhabitants, closely followed by India with 1.3 billion, as the world’s most populous country. Together, they make up 37 percent of the world’s population. More men than women A total of 50.4 percent of the world’s population is male, and 49.6 percent is female. Fertility has fallen Since the 1960s, the global birth rate has fallen to an average of 2.5 births per woman. However, that average is made up of highly diverse figures: in Africa its 4.7 births per woman, in Europe it’s 1.6 births per woman. Getting older An increasing number of people are living to a ripe old age. In 1950, there were far more young than old. In 2017, there are fewer young and more older people. By 2050, the numbers will even out.
    read more
  • Population Notes (JC Geography)
    These notes are mine and these consist of only notes of Population stuff that has come up on past exam questions.
    read more
  • 7 Billion: How Did We Get So Big So Fast?
    http://skunkbear.tumblr.com It was just over two centuries ago that the global population was 1 billion — in 1804. But better medicine and improved agriculture resulted in higher life expectancy for children, dramatically increasing the world population, especially in the West. As higher standards of living and better health care are reaching more parts of the world, the rates of fertility — and population growth — have started to slow down, though the population will continue to grow for the foreseeable future. U.N. forecasts suggest the world population could hit a peak of 10.1 billion by 2100 before beginning to decline. But exact numbers are hard to come by — just small variations in fertility rates could mean a population of 15 billion by the end of the century. Produced by Adam Cole Cinematography by Maggie Starbard
    read more
  • Hans Rosling: Global population growth, box by box
    http://www.ted.com The world's population will grow to 9 billion over the next 50 years -- and only by raising the living standards of the poorest can we check population growth. This is the paradoxical answer that Hans Rosling unveils at TED@Cannes using colorful new data display technology (you'll see). TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes. TED stands for Technology, Entertainment, Design, and TEDTalks cover these topics as well as science, business, development and the arts. Closed captions and translated subtitles in a variety of languages are now available on TED.com, at http://www.ted.com/translate. Watch a highlight reel of the Top 10 TEDTalks at http://www.ted.com/index.php/talks/top10
    read more
  • Water Food Energy Nexus
    Nice graphic explanation of the water-food-energy nexus - links well to challenges of future population growth topic
    read more
  • WorldMapper.org
    Worldmapper is a collection of world maps, where territories are re-sized on each map according to the subject of interest.
    read more